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Updated: September 21, 2021

Animal Science Meetings

A list of meetings/events for Animal and Livestock Producers
Goat Tasting and Twilight Meeting at the Western Maryland Research and Education Center
Updated: September 8, 2021

Cattle Tales Livestock Newsletter

This quarterly newsletter is focused on bringing timely, relevant information to Maryland's livestock producers
Updated: September 2, 2021

Cattle Tales Livestock Newsletter-May 2021

Cattle Tales Livestock is a quarterly newsletter published by the University of Maryland Extension that focuses on bringing timely, relevant information to Maryland's livestock producers. Topics in this issue (May 2021, Edition 1) are: Body Condition Score is a Critical Management, Tool for Cow-Calf Producers, Determining your Pasture Stocking Rate, Getting your Herd Ready for the Breeding Season, Considerations for Improving Hay Quality, Culling considerations for beef cow-calf herd, Controlling Flies and Ticks in Your Livestock, Implanting Pre-weaned Calves, and When should I deworm my sheep/goats?
Updated: August 26, 2021

Women In Agriculture Webinar Series on Risk Management: Production

This webpage is the production archives of the Women In Agriculture webinars.
Updated: June 29, 2021

Determining your Pasture Stocking Rate

How many animals will my pasture support? This is a common question, especially for the first-time livestock producer. Unfortunately, it is a complex and often difficult question to be answered.
Cattle on pasture
Updated: June 29, 2021

When should I deworm my sheep/goats?

When they need it. No longer is it recommended that sheep/goats be dewormed preventively or based on the calendar. Nor is it recommended that all animals in a group be dewormed at the same time. These approaches have caused the worms (especially the barber pole worm) to develop resistance to the dewormers. Dewormers (called anthelmintics) are antiparasitic drugs. They should be given to treat clinical disease, not prevent it. Good management is what prevents clinical disease.
Sheep looking out of structure
Updated: June 29, 2021

Controlling Flies and Ticks in Your Livestock

Fly and tick season is here, unfortunately. But there are management methods, both chemical and environmental, that will help you better control both the fly and tick populations that are going to try and wreak havoc with your livestock. Generally, in a pasture-based setting, chemical control of flies and ticks is going to be more effective than most environmental management strategies, though an integrated approach of both is recommended.
Beef Cattle Face Flies
Updated: January 21, 2021

Maryland Niche Meats & Poultry Producers Directory (EB-402)

The Maryland Niche Meats & Poultry Producers Directory was developed jointly by the Maryland Niche Meat and Poultry Working Group and the Ag Marketing Program of University of Maryland Extension. This directory serves as a way to connect buyers, consumers, producers and market masters to fresh, high-quality farm-raised meats from Maryland producers. For ease of aggregating suppliers, this directory has been organized by product, though many producers offer multiple products. USDA on listing only applies to Beef, Bison, Chevon, Lamb, and Pork.
Updated: January 20, 2021

Maryland 4-H Requirements and Tools for Exhibiting 4-H Sheep Projects

When preparing to show livestock in 4-H it can be overwhelming at times with the rules and guidelines that are found within the Maryland 4-H program and specifically in your individual county. If you take the time to read over the rules and guidelines and have open communication with your 4-H Extension Educator, 4-H Sheep Department Superintendents and your Club Leader it becomes an easier process to ensure a positive experience.
Updated: January 5, 2021

Alfalfa Weevil A Pest of Early Season Alfalfa

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an important forage crop for dairy and beef cattle, swine, poultry, sheep, and horses. In Maryland, alfalfa weevil, Hypera postica (Gyllenhal) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), occasionally cause significant damage on susceptible cultivars. Alfalfa weevil was first detected in Utah in 1904, and has since spread throughout the contiguous United States. It was first detected in Maryland in 1951. Efforts to suppress alfalfa weevil populations in Maryland have been largely successful because of biological control, but continued monitoring and management programs are vital to avoid localized pest outbreaks.