Maryland Regional Crop Reports header
Updated: August 9, 2022

Western Maryland

Garrett, Allegany, and Washington Counties

Northern Maryland

Carroll, Baltimore, Harford Counties, and Baltimore City

Central Maryland

Frederick, Howard, and Montgomery Counties

Upper & Mid Shore

Cecil, Kent, Queen Anne's, Talbot, and Caroline Counties

Lower Shore

Dorchester, Somerset, Wicomico, and Worcester Counties

Southern Maryland

Anne Arundel, Prince George's, Charles, St. Marys, and Calvert Counties 

August 2022

Western Maryland

Overall crops are looking good. While rain has been spotty, every area of the county has gotten sufficient enough precipitation that our crops are doing well. Corn silage harvest is just around the corner and third cutting alfalfa is off and in the barn or trench. While yields are expected to be good we can't count our bushels before they are in the bin. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

We've had a few scattered storms roll through over the last few days with some much-needed rain and a little relief from the heat. Overall, crops look good. We could use a bit more rain in some areas, though, especially since we're in the grain filling stages in corn and about to be there in full season beans. Double crop beans have some insect pressure but nothing out of the ordinary. In July, no fall armyworm moths were caught, and only three western bean cutworm moths were caught.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co.

Northern Maryland

July had it’s ups and downs for our region. Prior to the 4th of July, growing conditions were nearly perfect. The weekend after July 4 was wet and delayed the remainder of wheat harvest, which affected quality in some fields. All in all, still a very good wheat crop. The middle of July then got hot and dry, although most of our soils held enough moisture to carry the crops to the next rain event, but crops on lighter soils definitely felt the stress. A significant line of storms came through a couple of weeks ago brining straight line winds upwards of 90 mph. Wind damage was significant and severe in some areas, including downed trees, power lines, barn roofs, and corn. Most of the corn has goosenecked but will make for a challenging harvest in those fields. Recently we have been receiving adequate rainfall and the crops still look above average. —Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

The upper and central area of the region has received some recent rains and corn remains at a record pace. On the other hand, the southern area of the region is getting drier by the day. Corn was a 2” rain away from a record crop. The corn in the southern area is turning brown, but not due to maturity! Similarly, soybeans in the central and northern areas look great and rain at the end of August to fill out the pods will ensure a great crop. Soybeans in the southern area are under severe drought stress and will need significant rain to recover. Spidermites are showing up in the drought stressed beans as expected with dry weather. Stink bugs seem to be present in most crops. Troublesome weeds like Palmer Amaranth and Ragweed are beginning to poke through beans. —Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Most soybean plantings are still in vegetative growth stage. Several growers indicated periods of stalled or slow growth this season. Corn is looking good, in reproductive stages. Certain areas of the lower shore had significant rain events that flooded fields. Herbicide-resistant weeds such as Palmer amaranth, ragweed, and marestail are present and posing management challenges. Deer continue to be overpopulating crop fields and damaging crops. —Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

Because of spotty rains over the last few weeks, some corn on sandier ground is starting to show signs of drought stress. Soybeans are variable, with stands with good early establishment looking good now and others struggling to catch up. Hot dry stretches have been good for hay making, especially with annual forages like sorghum sudangrass. —Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

July 2021

Western Maryland

Warm and moist depending on where you are in the county. The warm days have been somewhat universal but depending on where you live you might have received a spritz or 4.5 inches. The rain seems to be highly variable so far this summer. The wheat is nearly all off and the yields have been good. The straw is baled and the soybean drills have been running close behind. Full-season beans and corn are looking good. Hayland and pastures are doing well the showers have kept them growing and not drying up. Recent storm cells have flooded some areas but all in all we are looking pretty good so far this year.—Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

Again this month, we've seen scattered rain across the region. However, we've had some good days for wheat and hay harvests. So far, I have not heard of issues with Fusarium head blight at harvest. Double crop beans are going in. No moths have been caught in the fall armyworm or western bean cutworm traps in western Montgomery County. Most of Frederick County is finished with small grain/wheat harvest, with about 70% of double crop acres planted and sprayed. Full season soybeans range from V3-R1, while corn ranges from V4-VT in some places. It appears that marestail got a late start this year outside of the burndown or post-spray window, as many corn and bean fields have 8-10" marestail. Japanese beetles appear to be the most prevalent pest of soybean, low pressure from other insects yet. With warm, wet weather in the near forecast, growers are advised to keep scouting for leaf diseases.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co. and Mark Townsend, Frederick Co.

Northern Maryland

In general, growing conditions have been great for much of the region, although slightly on the dry side on some of our drier soils; however, nothing dire just yet. A lot of hay was made a couple of weeks ago when we had near perfect weather. Barley harvest wrapped up about a week ago and a significant portion of the wheat crop has been harvested—showers this week has grinded harvest to a halt. I am hearing reports of great yields and great quality. Wheat straw market is still strong enough to make it worth baling instead of leaving it in the field to offset some potash prices. Corn is looking good and earliest planted is in tassel. Soybeans also look good. Overall, pest pressure this year has been low thus far.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

Soil moisture has been on the edge of dry, up until a few days ago. Most of the crops are good, but have only been a couple days from drought before another thunderstorm. In the last few days, the region has received numerous storms dropping inches of rain. Corn is tasseling with good soil moisture. The crop is uniform with excellent yield potential and expectations. Soybeans are also off to a great start with group 3’s beginning blooming. Wheat yield was above average and double crop beans are also off to a good start. Good hay was made between thunderstorms at the end of May.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Wheat has been mostly harvested. Yields were average to above average. Corn maturity is varied. Early planted corn is tasseling. Corn that was planted late due to rainy weather is still in early vegetative stages. Double-crop soybean is being planted. Full season soybean is about 1 foot tall on average, in vegetative stage. Non-irrigated crops are showing signs of water stress, particularly in sandier soils.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The region received some much needed rain this week. Corn is beginning to tassel. The crop overall looks very good. Wheat is now mostly done. The crop came off quick this year with reports of good yields and quality. Double crop soybeans are being planted now. The soybean crop is a bit more variable with some areas receiving a bit too much rain during planting and some fields are spotty. Common ragweed and marestail are present in many double crop wheat fields. It will be important to have a plan to control these before the beans emerge. Hay fields are responding nicely to recent rains. Vegetable harvest is about 1-2 weeks behind schedule this year.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

June 2022

Western Maryland

Erratic temperature swings and scattered showers continue to challenge planting and hay-making. Wheat and barley crops are looking good. Grass hay tonnage should be well ahead of last year but the quality may suffer a bit due to its maturity. Corn planting is wrapping up as are full-season beans. All in all the growing season is off to a good start.—Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

Rainfall has been scattered and heavy in some areas over the last month. Between this and periods of cooler temperatures, field work has been a challenge. However, with the heat wave we're currently getting, things should jump up out of the ground quickly. Most corn has been planted and has emerged. Some soybeans have been planted. First cutting of hay has been behind compared to previous years. Most of Frederick County is planted with many fields of both corn and beans emerging. Early corn is in the V1-2 range while most beans are VE-VC. Most hay operators have completed their first cutting of cool-season perennials (orchardgrass/pasture hay) within the last week with the warmer, dryer weather. Similarly, first cutting alfalfa is pretty well completed for most of the county. Weed pressure seems ordinary so far; pokeweed seems off to a strong start in some high pressure fields.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co. & Mark Townsend, Frederick Co.

Northern Maryland

The weather has finally cooperated and has given us several good field days in May. Most corn is in the ground and emerged and a significant dent has been made in full season bean planting. Corn growth is all over the place from not emerged to V5 due to the delayed and spread out planting season. A few early soybean plantings have had some slug problems due to the cooler wet weather we had in early May. Wheat and barley are slightly behind normal progress and we are just starting to see head blight symptoms in wheat. First cut alfalfa is wrapped up and first cutting grass hay has been in full force this week and will continue with a few hot, sunny days.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

Corn is at various stages across the region, but off to a good start. Side-dressing corn is well underway. Soybeans also vary in growth and seem to be slow to close in the rows. Some replanting is needed due to slug feeding. Barley harvest will start in a few days with wheat right behind. Recent weather has finally changed favorable for hay harvest.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Wheat and barley are drying down. Corn has been planted, and is generally around V1 to V5 stage. We had significant rain mid-May, which halted corn planting. Due to flooded conditions, some fields had to be replanted. Early soybean plantings have emerged; however, most soybean planting was delayed due to the weather. Hay cutting has just now resumed after rain. Deer damage on corn is evident on many fields. Herbicide-resistant weeds, such as common ragweed, marestail, and Palmer amaranth, are starting to emerge. Now is the time to spray these seedlings to stay ahead on control.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The region has received regular rains over the last month, with enough breaks to finish up with corn and get most full season beans planted. Corn has emerged well and was looking for sunshine and warmer days, which it received in the last week. Fields were variable with yellow and uneven growth but have greened up nicely now. There are some areas with poor stands due to heavy rainfall. Side-dress N applications have begun this week on corn. On average, PSNT results are coming back in the lower range. Full season soybean planting is wrapping up. We have had some slug damage in isolated fields. Barley will be ready to come off in a week or so. Wheat fields are beginning to yellow. Ryegrass continues to be the largest weed challenge in wheat. Rains have delayed hay cutting this spring. There was a lot of nice dry hay made in the last few days.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

May 2022

Western Maryland

Erratic weather patterns continue to dominate and challenge us here in Washington County. While we can still use precipitation, it has recently been coupled with wild temperature swings. In the 70s or low 80s and then back to the low fifties with nighttime temperatures on several occasions hovering near freezing. Triticale harvest is over half finished but very little corn has gone in the ground. First cutting alfalfa will begin early next week barring rain showers. First cutting hay of any kind looks like it will be below normal. Forever the optimist, second cutting will be better.—Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

Small grain silage harvest is in full swing. Manure is being hauled and corn is being planted. Some soybeans have been planted. First cutting of hay may also start soon. Over the past month, most of the area has been at or above normal rainfall, according to the National Weather Service. Field work may slow down depending on much rain we get this weekend, but next week is forecasted to be drier and in the 70s. —Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co.

Northern Maryland

The trend for April has been a continuation of March—cool temperatures that rarely want to move out of the 60s. As a result, the start of planting was about a 5-10 days later than usual for this region. Most planting kicked off the week of Easter. In general, small grains look good. Barley is headed out and wheat is a couple of weeks away. Some rye has been chopped for feed. Pastures and hay fields are enjoying the cooler temperatures.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

Soil moisture has been perfect for spring crops, field work, and planting. Soil temperatures have been a little cool for this time of year. Many acres of corn and beans have went in over the past week. Barley is fully headed and wheat will be in a few days. Both look good. Hay and pastures look good, but the cool weather has them a little behind normal.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Wheat is starting to pollinate. It’s been a relatively dry spring, making for an average to above average wheat crop, with minimal disease pressure. Cover crops have been mostly terminated. However, where still standing, cover crops are looking great. These late-terminated cover crops should bring additional benefits to the fields, such as providing substantial organic matter to the soil, and in some cases releasing nitrogen on the soil surface. Growers have spread poultry manure. Weather has been relatively favorable these last couple of weeks for planting. Corn has started to be planted. Much more corn acreage is expected to be planted in the next weeks, to be followed by soybean planting.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The region has experienced good planting conditions over the last week. Corn planting progress is still a bit behind schedule with cooler soils limiting the number of early-planted acres. Most farmers are finishing up with corn planting and have started with soybean planting. Recent showers were welcome with soil conditions becoming slightly dry during the last couple of weeks. Wheat is in the early heading stage and many fields will be flowering by the time you read this. Farmers will be evaluating the need for a head scab fungicide in the next few days. Many wheat fields are exhibiting yellowing in the upper canopy that is not readily attributable to any disease. We are also seeing a lot of powdery mildew in the lower canopy, but very little in the upper canopy. Insect and disease pressure has been light so far. Forage crops look great this spring. Alfalfa weevil are very active this year and many fields required treatment. Pyrethroid resistance continues to be an issue for our growers. First cutting of cool season grasses is underway.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

April 2022

Western Maryland

As I write we are receiving spring showers for which we are grateful. March came in like a lamb and went out like a lion. Both March and April thus far have been erratic with temperature swings and high winds. This rain is a blessing as we have been on the dry side. Wheat, barley and triticale are looking good after the first application of nitrogen which as everyone know is much pricier this year. Grass and alfalfa are slowly greening up and before you know it the corn planters will be in the fields. Manure applications are continuing as field conditions permit. So in short to quote a country song, "Sounds like life to me." —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

There have been a few warm days over the last month, but temperatures were often down around freezing at night. Some manure applications and field preparations have been happening the past few weeks, but the rain this week has put a stop to field work for now.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co.

Northern Maryland

Winter has been drier than usual; however, recent rains have provided adequate moisture. Small grains are coming out of winter looking good and wheat is just beginning to joint. The fluctuating weather conditions have made for sporadic periods of field work; recently, fields have been fit for lime and manure applications and other spring prep work but I’d say we are slightly behind our average for spring field work progress. Temperatures have been below normal and soil temperatures are running a couple of degrees shy of 50 °F. Early soybean and corn planting should start in a couple of weeks if temperatures warm up a bit and all goes as planned.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

As of April 5th, soil moisture has been ideal for spreading lime, fertilizer, and manure. First and second applications of nitrogen went on small grain very easily (with the exception of high winds). Small grain looks good and seems to be ahead of schedule for this time of year. Barring excessive rain, corn and bean planting will start next week. —Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Winter wheat is looking good. Growers have been applying manure and working the land in some fields. Farmers are starting to terminate cover crops, while most of the landscape is still green. Fields without cover crops have a flush of winter weeds. Corn planting has not begun yet, but expected in the next few weeks. We had a recent cold snap that prevented early planting. Fields are now wet due to recent rains.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

Wheat crops are greening up and looking good this year. So good, in fact, that some are cancelling MACS contracts in favor of harvesting for grain. Two consecutive nights with high winds temperatures below freezing provided a scare for strawberry and tree fruit that were in bloom. Reports suggest strawberries fared well under row covers, but the impact on peaches and other tree fruit may be seen later in the season.—Alan Leslie, Charles Co.

November 2021

Western Maryland

The trees are coloring, while not as pretty as when we receive summer showers but we will take it. Four good nights of hard freezes give us hope winter will bring some healing from insects and disease. Nearly all of the corn and beans are in the bins and the wheat, barley, rye, and triticale are planted. The last of the dairy manure will soon hit the ground and everyone will head to the shop to begin winter repairs and maintenance looking towards spring 2022. Depending on where you are located in the county, grain yields were mostly unaffected but hay and silage yields were down. Looking forward to a better 2022. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

After temperatures dipped down to freezing at night for a day or two last week, we finally have a few warm, sunny days to continue harvest, which rains in the past month had made challenging. On average, I have heard reports of at or above average corn and soybean yields, as well as some local and regional mills being full.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co.

Northern Maryland

In general, harvest ‘21 has been very smooth. Weather has cooperated with the exception of a few cloudy/rainy days in October that stopped combines for a few days. Just about all corn and full season beans have been harvested, the majority of what’s still sanding in fields are double crops. Yields for corn, full-season, and double crop beans have been very strong across the board. Soil temperatures and moisture conditions made for very good cover crop and small grain establishment. The talk of supply shortages, double and tripling fertilizer costs and other rising inputs has put a damper on an otherwise exciting harvest. Hopefully 2022 inputs will not price us out of farming!—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

It has been a very smooth harvest season. Bean harvest is winding down, with most farmers finishing full season beans and working on double crop beans. Small grain and cover crops look excellent.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Corn harvest is complete. About 30-40% of soybean has been harvested. Recent floods and high water table in the region have delayed some fields from being harvested. Wheat planting is progressing well with 70-80% of the acreage planted. Early planted small grains have emerged and are looking good at this time. While cover crop planting is still underway, many early-planted fields are already seeing substantial growth. This fall cover crop growth should provide great benefits in terms of scavenging leftover nutrients from the soil. If conditions are favorable, we are expecting a lot more cover crop to be seeded with the extended MDA planting date deadline.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

Weather conditions have been decent for harvest with the last of the corn coming off now. Farmers are scrambling to finish up soybean harvest as well. Soybeans have been hard to get down to 13% moisture in many cases. Both corn and soybean yields have been very good to excellent. Small grain planting is a bit behind schedule due to the weather conditions as of late. Most folks are getting cover crop and wheat planting finished up this week. This area received its first frost last week; we still haven’t received a hard frost but most vegetable crops are finished. Time to put this season to bed and get ready for next spring.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

October 2021

Western Maryland

The weather has remained kind to us here in Washington County. We have had welcome rains that have been gentle in their nature. Soil moisture is at its optimum for fall planting. Early soybeans and corn harvest has begun, yields have yet to be reported. Most corn silage has been harvested and planting of winter annuals has begun. Additionally, wheat seeding will soon commence. — Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

As I write this, it is lightly raining here at the Montgomery County Extension Office. Corn grain harvest is in full swing. I have not seen any soybean fields come off yet. Corn yields have varied depending on location and summer rainfall, but have overall been close to or slightly above average. — Kelly Nichols

Northern Maryland

Conditions have been ideal for corn harvest. Corn harvest started around the second week of September and is now in full swing. Yields are variable but most fields are running average to above average. A few acres of early soybeans have been harvested; double crop soybeans continue to look very strong. We’ve had good soil conditions for cover crop, small grain, and pasture seeding. — Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

Corn and soybean harvest is moving along smoothly, with the exception of lines at the granaries. It takes time to deliver high yields to market. We are setting records in both bean and corn yields. Farmers are reporting yields that they have never seen before! Soil moisture is adequate throughout the region with the few dry and wet spots. Cover crops are off to a great start. Troublesome weeds like glyphosate-resistant common ragweed and palmer amaranth are really showing up as beans are drying and the weeds are still green. Remember those fields for next year. — Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

The harvest season is progressing with no major problems. Corn is approximately 60% harvested. Soybean is drying down and ready to start harvest within the next week if the weather cooperates. Wheat and barley planting will begin soon. However, the ground is harder than desired at the moment due to lack of rain. Cover crop planting is going well; we have had significant acreage aerially seeded and ground planting has begun. — Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

Conditions have been favorable for good progress on corn harvest. Yields are very good to excellent in most areas. Full season soybeans are mature and drying down. Some farmers started harvesting early-planted full season beans last week. Double crop soybeans are also looking very good. Vegetable harvest is winding up. The pumpkin and cucurbit crop is coming off now, with a decent pumpkin harvest this year. We did receive a report of alfalfa with second infestation of fall armyworm, assuming the next generation is now active. — Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

September 2021

Western Maryland

Welcome rains have come to the area. Too late for some crops but late beans, hay, and fall crops will enjoy the drink. Corn silage harvest has been going on since early August with some of the crop drought-stressed in some areas of the county. Rain patterns all summer were scattered and erratic. At this writing, the remnants of Ida are replenishing soil moisture.—Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Northern Maryland

The past 2-3 weeks have been very hot and humid and has really driven accelerated maturity of corn and soybeans, especially in pockets of the region that did not receive as much rain over the summer and on lighter soils; I think it’s likely taken some yield off the top of the corn crop and some soybeans. Double crop soybeans have put on a lot of growth and are looking good; hopefully, the September weather will favor good pod fill. Corn silage harvest started about two weeks ago. The heat stress has also brought out a lot of symptoms related to stem diseases in soybean, as well as fall armyworms in hayfields (and lawns). Corn for grain is nearly all dented and the earliest at black layer. With the recent heat, the corn grain harvest should start in a couple of weeks.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Central Maryland

As I'm writing this, Ida is giving us what might be the first county-wide rainfall; most rainfall to date has been scattered across the region, leaving parts of the area drier than others. Our usual soybean insect pests are munching away in soybean fields; however, soybeans can withstand a fair amount of leaf defoliation before a spray threshold is reached. Scout fields for leaf defoliation and/or pod damage in order to determine if the threshold has been reached. Traps for fall armyworm and western bean cutworm near Poolesville have remained empty. Recent rainfall has greatly improved double-crop beans and brought a lot of drought and heat stress corn back around just in time for grain fill. Folks were really starting to get going with corn silage harvest before the Tropical storm shut them down. I've heard from some Extension colleagues a little further south and they are experiencing the largest infestation of armyworms in years. I received a report of one field of Teff grass being severely defoliated by armyworms just this week. Although we aren't capturing many in traps we should keep an eye out for this destructive pest.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co. & Jarette Hurry, Frederick Co. 

Upper and Mid Shore

Soil moisture is adequate in most areas and surplus in a few areas. Corn harvest will begin next week. Cover crop seeding is well underway and the early seeded cover crops are off to a great start. Most farmers are anxious to get combines moving as the crop looks good. Soybeans are tall and filling out well. There are areas of sudden death syndrome showing up in many fields as would be expected with recent weather patterns. Hayfields still look good, but we have not been blessed with good haymaking conditions.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Corn is looking good and approaching black layer. Soybean looks great and pods are beginning to fill. We have had adequate rain in most places, even while storms have been somewhat sporadic. Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth is apparent in many fields. Now is the time to walk the fields to pull mature Palmer plants. There have been no reports of major insect pest or disease outbreaks in grain crops. It's looking like it will be a strong yield for grain yields.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The region has received widespread rains in the last three weeks. Corn is in grain fill stages with the earliest fields ready for harvest any day now. Yields are expected to be good to very good. Rains helped the soybean condition as well. Double crop beans have really responded well with excellent growth. Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) is now evident, with patches showing up mainly in full-season beans. We are also seeing Phytophthora crown and root rot show up in fields. Insect and mite pressure remains low. Palmer amaranth, common waterhemp, and common ragweed escapes are clearly visible now with seed heads waving from above the plant canopy. Annual grass hay is being cut for the second time. Cool-season grass is beginning to respond to the moisture with growth resuming.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

August 2021

Western Maryland

We had a great wheat harvest and many optimists planted double-crop beans. It has been very dry in most of the county. Depending on where in the county you are located is the difference between chopping corn now and admiring your crop. Hay will be in short supply so many will plant forage oats for fall forage. Full season beans are looking good in most places. We will continue to pray for rain. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Central Maryland

In general, Central Maryland has had a good combination of heat and rain, and the crops are looking great. Most of the region is close to or above the normal rainfall over the last 30 days. Fall armyworm and western bean cutworm traps near Poolesville have been empty this past month. Corn silage harvest will begin soon, especially if August turns up the heat.—Kelly Nichols, Montgomery Co.

Northern Maryland

We’ve been fortunate to have excellent pollination conditions over the past 3 weeks when the vast majority of the corn crop was pollinating. Temperatures were in the upper 80s and occasionally low 90s with frequent storms that brought timely moisture. The majority of the corn crop is looking above average. Full season soybeans are beginning to set pots and look good; some fields had very spotty emergence due to slug damage early; we will see what August brings in terms of rain to help make the bean crop. Double crops had good soil moisture to germinate and are off to a decent start. Insect and disease pest pressure in both corn and beans has been minimal so far. Small grain harvest wrapped up a couple of weeks ago with big wheat yields.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

Soil moisture levels are all over the board. Some areas have been receiving rains while others have not. None of the region is too wet. Therefore, corn and early bean yield predictions also vary, but are not disastrous. Corn will be 100-250 bu/acre plus. Early beans will be 40-80 bu/acre plus. Later maturing beans still have a long ways to go. Corn leaf diseases have been expanding/moving up the plant in the last few weeks. Soybean diseases have been minimal, but foliage-feeding insects are increasing. Luckily most of the beans have plenty of foliage and can withstand some feeding. Trouble weeds, especially the glyphosate-resistant weeds are starting to outgrow beans and showing their ugly heads(growing points). As with past months, there has been good quality hay harvested.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

The weather has been favorable and grain crops are looking good. Corn is around R3 reproductive stage. Full-season soybean is flowering. Deer are regularly observed grazing in soybean fields. Corn Earworm numbers are currently low. Herbicide-resistant weeds such as ragweed, marestail, and Palmer amaranth are present and posing management challenges.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The story this month is squarely focused on moisture. Temperatures across the region are reaching into the 90’s with sporadic isolated storms hitting here and there. Crops are now showing moisture stress. The corn crop is past pollination and approaching dough stage on earliest plantings. We could really use another rain to help fill corn out, but it’s looking to be at least an average crop. Soybeans are setting pods, with full-season beans at R3-R5. We have not seen many pest outbreaks in beans yet. We are on the lookout for spider mites with the hot dry conditions. Cool-season grasses are going dormant in the hot dry weather.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

July 2021

Western Maryland

The barley harvest is complete and the yield reports are very favorable. The combines moved t the wheat fields and that harvest is now underway with the balers following close behind. Early reports of wheat yields are also favorable. Corn and early beans looking good after a little battle with Mr. Slug and his friends. The recent heat has been good for the crops and allows for a favorable harvest, rains and cooler temperatures are forecast to be on the horizon. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Northern Maryland

Crops looks very good across Northern Maryland, and we just received some timely rains that the corn and soybeans will appreciate and should make for good double-crop planting/germination conditions. Wheat harvest is progressing with reports of average to very good yields and heavy test weights. Most all corn has been top dressed with the second shot of N. Earliest planted corn will be tasseling in a couple of weeks and early planted group III soybeans are very close to R1. There has been spots of some severe slug damage on early planted soybean fields. A lot of hay was put up over the past few weeks with the good drying weather.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

The heavier soils on the upper part of the shore are holding up well. However, the mid-shore is getting dry, and hoping for July 4th rains! Wheat harvest is almost complete with yields being average and above. The dry/cool/long grain fill period proved good for wheat yields again. Scab was low to nonexistent. Corn is beginning to tassel/silk and looks good. Early planted Group 3 soybeans are blooming and look good. So far, there has been plenty of moisture for germination of double-crop beans. There have been many acres of 2,4-D and Dicamba beans sprayed with minimal off-site movement issues.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Corn growth has taken off in the last couple of weeks. On average it’s about 4-5 feet tall. Sidedress N has been applied or is currently being applied to late-planted corn. Full-season soybean has been planted and on average is at the V4 stage, and 7-10” tall. For the most part, crops are looking good, although corn is showing some signs of water stress in sandier areas. Wheat harvest began around June 20th and is ongoing. Wheat yields are reported as average.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

As I write this, temperatures across the region are reaching into the upper 90’s and rain has been hard to come by. Crops are moisture stressed, with earlier corn just beginning to tassel. Critical rains are expected today and tomorrow, so hopefully, by the time this is read, all crops will have received some much-needed moisture. The barley harvest is mostly complete and wheat harvest is well on the way. Yields have been good to very good given the wet fall. Some wheat is taking its time drying down. Soybeans are in good condition. Very early planted beans have made good strides. Beans planted the first or second week of May are a bit behind compared to most years. Spider mites are plentiful in vegetable crops and will begin to show up in bean fields soon, especially if the hot, dry weather continues. The second cutting of hay is being made now. We need more rain so keep cutting.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

June 2021

Washington County

Corn and beans are all in the ground for the most part and the first cutting hay is in the barn. We received some welcome rain and cooler temperatures but it looks like the heat is coming back. That's good for the corn as long as the rain showers continue. Wheat and barley are in full head and ripening nicely. Some alfalfa second cutting has been harvested and the rest will be soon.—Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Northern Maryland

For the most part, all corn and nearly all full-season soybeans are in the ground and coming along nicely. Earliest planted soybeans are around V4, earliest corn is close to V6 and sidedress nitrogen is starting along with post-emerge herbicides. Barley is ripening and wheat is looking good so far—still a bit too early to notice any head scab symptoms but the weather has been dry so scab should be fairly low this year. We received some very much-needed rain over Memorial Day. Prior to the rain, it was perfect hay weather, and first cutting of alfalfa has been made. Triticale yields were reported to be very strong.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

We were getting dry before the Memorial Day weekend rain. Corn and beans are both off to a great start. Post-emergent herbicide applications are under full swing. Corn is being sidedressed. Barley harvest will start Monday. Wheat still looks good with scab levels very low. Lots of high-quality hay was made before last weeks’ rains.—Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Wheat has flowered and is drying down. Cover crops have been terminated, although some were saved for wheat harvest due to favorable spring growth. Corn has been planted, and is generally around VE to V3 stage. I’d estimate half of soybean acreage has been planted. The earliest planted beans are around V2. We had a couple of weeks of very dry weather, which caused some growers to pause planting. Over Memorial Day weekend, it rained 2-3”, which was much needed to recharge the soil profile. Herbicide-resistant weeds, such as common ragweed, marestail, and Palmer amaranth, are starting to emerge. Now is the time to spray these seedlings to stay ahead on control.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

The region experienced a dry spell in the last month but rains returned over the last couple of weeks. Corn growth continues to be behind most years with many variable fields. Most corn fields are exhibiting some yellowing chlorotic growth. I expect plants to green up soon with return of moisture and warmer growing conditions. We have had some issues with pre herbicide activity most likely due to limited moisture to activate herbicide into the germination zone. Side-dress N applications have begun this week on corn. Full season soybean planting is wrapping up. Barley will be ready to come off any day. Wheat fields are beginning to yellow. Unfortunately, we continue to see increasing levels of ryegrass in wheat. This has been a tough year for killing ryegrass prior to planting corn and soybeans. Cooler weather and tank mixes may be limiting herbicide activity as well as some potential herbicide resistance. There was a lot of nice dry hay during the dry spell.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

May 2021

Western Maryland

The weather here has been a little dry. Soil moisture levels are adequate but more rain would be welcome once the corn is planted. Triticale harvest is rushing to a conclusion to make way for manure tankers followed closely by the corn planter. Full season soybeans are also being planted and the first of the alfalfa is being mowed. Wheat is looking good and barley is in full head. Hopefully, May will bring more showers than April did. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Northern Maryland

Corn and full-season soybean planting has been in full swing for about two weeks now. The weather and soil conditions have been great. We were starting to get slightly dry but some timely showers this week brought some needed moisture. Corn and soybeans that have emerged look very good. Barley is heading out, triticale has been cut, and wheat varieties are between boot and heading. Right now head blight risk is low in our region, but that can change quickly so don’t fall asleep on it!—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

 

Upper & Mid Shore

Barley is in stage 10.1 - 10.5 and looks good. Wheat is in stage 10 - 10.1 and also looks good. Corn and soybean planting is moving along rapid and smooth. Soil conditions have been ideal since planting started. Early planted corn and beans are germinating and emerging without too many issues. We are off to a good start. There have been a few acres of hay cut and baled. Most of the rest will be cut in the next few dry days. —Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

 

Lower Shore

Wheat is in boot stage or starting to head. Cover crops have been mostly terminated. Growers are spreading poultry manure and some lime. There has been more tillage than normal this spring, as wet conditions during harvest last fall caused ruts in fields. 10-20% of corn acreage has been planted. Weather has been relatively favorable these last couple of weeks for planting, although scattered rains have prevented some fields from drying out. A few farmers have started planting soybean, with much more acreage anticipated for next week.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Marland

The region has experienced good planting conditions over the last couple of weeks. Corn planting progress is still a bit behind schedule with cooler soils limiting the number of early-planted acres. We have earlier planted soybeans this year as well. Germination and plant stands for both crops look good. Recent rains have made for ideal conditions for slugs. Farmers are keeping a careful eye out especially in no-till fields with heavy crop residue. Wheat is at the late boot to early heading stage. Farmers will be evaluating the need for a head scab fungicide in the next week. Insect and disease pressure has been light so far. Forage crops look great this spring. Alfalfa weevil were active very early this year and many fields required treatment. Pyrethroid resistance in alfalfa weevil is common in our area. First cutting of cool season grasses is underway. Tobacco transplants are ready to go to the field this week.—Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

April 2021

Western Maryland

March is usually a month of somewhat turbulent, and this year was no exception. We have had high temperatures in the 70's and the 40's with several nights in the 20's. We have been blessed with moisture that has almost like clockwork followed by a day or two of high winds. In short, soil moisture is good, but soil temperatures are still low, so everyone with a corn planter is getting itchy. Wheat, triticale, and other grains have been fertilized, and weed control has also been applied. Manure pits are being emptied, and poultry litter is being spread in anticipation of corn planting. Rising fertilizer prices are presenting challenges this spring as well. Yet in agriculture, we are internal optimists, yields will always be high, and prices will always be good. Happy Spring, everyone. —Jeff Semler, Washington Co.

Northern Maryland

Prior to a few storms over the past couple of weeks, the region has been on the dry side. With the recent rains, we are now leaning on the wet side. Temperature fluctuations this winter led to some very stressed-looking wheat, but plants have recovered nicely now that nitrogen applications have been made and wheat should be jointing in the next week or so if temperatures warm. Lime, litter, and fertilizer applications continue where the ground is fit; although there has been some availability issues with lime. As long as the weather cooperates, planting should begin in 2-3 weeks.—Andy Kness, Harford Co.

Upper & Mid Shore

The first application of nitrogen went on small grains a couple of weeks ago. Wheat and barley are growing well with the recent warm weather. Lime, manure, and potash applicators have been in high gear on the few dry days in between the many wet days. A few of last fall/winters harvest ruts have been worked out, but many still remain.  It’s starting off to look like a long spring as the wet weather continues! —Jim Lewis, Caroline Co.

Lower Shore

Winter wheat is looking good. Growers have been applying manure and working the land in some fields. Only about 10% of cover crops have been terminated as of now. I have not seen any early-season corn planted yet. Fields are quite wet due to recent rains, with another 1+ inch of rain forecasted for this week.—Sarah Hirsh, Somerset Co.

Southern Maryland

Farmers are busy preparing for planting and the upcoming growing season. The region had a few good weeks of conditions for fieldwork until the rain set in recently. Everyone is busy spreading litter/manure, applying herbicides, and completing field operations before planting commences in the next couple of weeks. Small grain crops are only in fair condition with many fields with sparse areas due to wet conditions in the fall. There have been some issues with sourcing crop inputs. Hayfields are greening up now. —Ben Beale, St. Mary’s Co.

Back to August 2022 Issue | July 2022 Issue | June 2022 Issue  |  May 2022 Issue | April 2022 Issue 

2021

November 2021 Issue | October 2021 Issue | September 2021 Issue  |  August 2021 Issue |  July 2021 Issue | June 2021 Issue 

Agronomy News is a statewide newsletter for farmers, consultants, researchers, and educators interested in grain and row crop forage production systems. This newsletter is published once a month during the growing season and will include topics pertinent to agronomic crop production. Subscribers will receive an email with the latest edition.

Subscribe