Aquafarming

Updated: April 7, 2021

Aquaculture Programs Brochure

University of Maryland Extension has conducted quality educational programs for aquaculture development for over four decades. These have included outreach training for the production of finfish, shellfish and aquatic plants. Our longest running programs have encouraged the production of oysters and clams, which are important resources for economic growth, employment and the environment.
Oysters
Updated: February 4, 2021

2019 Extension Annual Report

The 2019 Extension annual report
2019 Annual Report
Updated: February 3, 2021

Remote Setting Systems: Producing Spat on Shell Oyster Seed for Aquaculture

Remote setting is a technique that uses hatchery larvae to produce spat on shell for planting oyster grounds. The method has been successfully employed as a key part in building the Maryland oyster aquaculture industry. This manual covers system components, operation and management and is used for training new growers and for reference by experienced ones to enable them to produce quality seed for planting leases.
Updated: January 22, 2021

Oyster Aquaculture Production Systems

Oyster aquaculture in Maryland is carried out using both traditional bottom leases as well as newer water column leases that utilize containment gear to produce single oysters. This manual describes the different types of production methods that can be used to build an aquaculture business and is designed to help prospective growers choose a method as well as equipment that will result in the production of high quality shellfish.
Updated: January 22, 2021

Nutrient Credit Trading Could Expand Maryland Oyster Aquaculture

Researchers from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES) conducted a study to evaluate the potential effect of nutrient credit trading on the growth and profitability of Maryland’s aquaculture industry. Nutrient credit trading is a market approach to lowering the cost of meeting the pollution caps that have been established to restore aquatic habitat in the Chesapeake Bay. Oyster aquaculture producers are eligible to sell credits in this emerging market, which creates the potential for economic and environmental benefits.
Updated: January 6, 2021

Chesapeake Bay Blue Catfish: Invasive, but Delicious and Nutritious

Blue Catfish is an invasive fish species in the Chesapeake Bay. Increasing commercial harvest and consumption is one way to reduce their numbers in our Bay. This fact sheet aims to enhance public awareness on this invasive species as a new commercial fishery resource and support this newly developed seafood industry for rapid response to the COVID-19 pandemic.