Publications

Areas of Interest
Showing 61-70 of 359 publications
Updated: May 11, 2022

Guidelines for Developing an Effective Fungicide Spray Program for Wine Grapes in Maryland (FS-848)

The purpose of this fact sheet is to help wine grape growers in Maryland develop effective fungicide spray programs to manage a complex of five major fungal diseases affecting vines and fruit: powdery mildew, downy mildew, black rot, Botrytis bunch rot, and Phomopsis cane and leaf spot. The spray schedules below suggest several options for each spray but do not include all fungicides registered in Maryland for control of these diseases. Three supplemental tables are provided to further assist growers in choosing fungicides. Table 1 rates the effectiveness of all fungicides mentioned in the fact sheet against these diseases. Information on effectiveness is intended as general guidance only. Results in a given vineyard will depend on the weather, disease pressure (level of inoculum present), canopy management, age of vines, fungicide formulation and rate, and spray intervals and coverage. Table 2 lists resistance-prone fungicides by chemical class (mode of action) to help growers choose rotational partners with different modes of action fungicides mentioned in this guide. Author: Anne DeMarsay, Ph.D., The Fruit DoctorTM; Title: The New Guidelines for Developing an Effective Fungicide Spray Program for Wine Grapes in Maryland, 2012 (FS-848)
Updated: May 11, 2022

Soil Sampling for Optimizing Agricultural Production in Maryland (FS-1184)

Soil samples provide information about the soil fertility status of a field, which is used to generate nutrient and lime recommendations and develop a farm's nutrient management plan. This factsheet outlines proper soil sampling techniques (how, when, why) to optimize crop production, minimize environmental degradation, and maximize farm profitability. Authors: Brian Kalmbach and Dr. Gurpal Toor; Title: Soil Sampling for Optimizing Agricultural Production in Maryland (FS-1184)
Updated: June 24, 2022

Precision Soil Sampling Helps Farmers Target Nutrient Application (FS-1046)

Precision agriculture allows modern producers to manage within fields rather than managing the whole field.¹‚² By integrating global positioning systems (GPS), variable rate (VR) application equipment, and geographic information systems (GIS), farmers are allowed increased efficiency. However, prior to using VR equipment, accurate maps of yield-limiting factors must be created.³,⁴,⁵5 Nutrients in any field vary due to topography, soil properties and past management (manure application patterns, crop history, etc.). To account for this variability, farmers will need more than one soil sample in each field (Figure 1a). A more intensive sampling scheme must be performed, through either grid or zone sampling. Looking to the future, on-the-go sensors, whether attached to tractors or unmanned aerial vehicles, may also increase accuracy and decrease the cost of soil sampling. Authors: Jarrod O. Miller and Craig W. Yohn; Title: Precision Soil Sampling Helps Farmers Target Nutrient Application (FS-1046)
Updated: May 7, 2022

Veterinary Science Experience (EC-13)

Veterinary Science Experience is a 5-lesson program that provides participants the basic tools and information for those interested in the veterinary science field. Each lesson provides an introduction into basic animal care from small animals to livestock. The lessons can be combined into a day-long veterinary science day or broken up to provide a multi-week program. Educators of all levels can easily adapt each lesson to fit their unique needs. Authors: Becky Ridgeway, Jeanne Williams, and Bonnie Boyden. Title: Veterinary Science Experience (EC-13)
Updated: March 23, 2022

Budgeting 101 for College Students (FS-1194)

Budgeting for college students presents unique challenges due to variations of income and expense. Combining a cash flow budget with a yearlong monthly financial plan allows planning for the variations of income and expenses that college students experience. Author: Jesse M. Ketterman, Ph.D.; Title: Budgeting 101 for College Students (FS-1194)
Updated: March 24, 2022

Energy Used in Homes, Businesses, and Farms is Typically Supplied as Heat or Electricity (EBR-63)

Modern civilization is possible because people have learned how to change energy from one form to another and then use it to do work. There are many different forms of energy, including heat, light, motion, electrical, and chemical. One practical example of energy use within our society, includes the conversion of the chemical energy stored in coal into electrical energy that can be used in our homes, farms, and businesses. We will review the primary sources of energy and the conversions between different forms of energy, while differentiating between thermal and electric energy. Author: Drew Schiavone, Title: Energy Used in Homes, Businesses, and Farms is Typically Supplied as Heat or Electricity (EBR-63)
Updated: March 10, 2022

Predicting Oyster Production: A Comparison of Natural Recruitment and Aquaculture (EB-449)

The Chesapeake Bay oyster resource and fishery have shown wide temporal population fluctuations generating controversy regarding restoration methods. Disagreements stem from a lack of accurate and defensible data upon which to base decisions. Many commercial oyster harvesters favor dredging using metal scrapes towed by powered harvest vessels as a beneficial practice. Harvesters state that expanding this type of dredging throughout the Bay would lead to increased biomass and public harvest. Scientific and environmental communities dispute this claim, pointing to differences between bottom renovation and recruitment. This has created problems for managers who must consider multiple factors in regulating fisheries. To understand the effect of dredging on populations, we analyzed data from scientific studies to predict the likely outcome of these activities. This paper evaluates the cost-effectiveness and effects on production of restoration options. We compare power dredging and natural recruitment to rebuild biomass to contemporary aquaculture techniques. Authors: Donald Webster and Donald Meritt; Title: Predicting Oyster Production: A Comparison of Natural Recruitment and Aquaculture (EB-449)
Updated: March 17, 2022

Healthy Eating with the Mediterranean Diet (FS-1168)

The Mediterranean diet is a healthy eating approach to address chronic disease. It emphasizes fresh fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, and whole grains as the foundation of the diet. Authors: Jennifer Dixon Cravens, and Dhruti Patel; Title: Healthy Eating with the Mediterranean Diet (FS-1168)
Updated: March 17, 2022

Understanding Glyphosate and Other Pesticides (FS-1193)

Recent concerns about the widespread use of glyphosate and its potential impacts have propelled this herbicide into the national spotlight. This article provides an overview of the regulatory processes glyphosate and other pesticides must undergo to ensure they do not pose unreasonable risks to human health or the environment. Author: Kurt Vollmer; Title: Understanding Glyphosate and Other Pesticides (FS-1193)
Updated: March 11, 2022

Control of Large Palmer Amaranth and Common Ragweed in Soybean or Corn (FS-1192)

Herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth and common ragweed are two weed species that pose a major challenge to farmers. It is recommended that an effective postemergence herbicide be applied before these weeds are 3- to 4-inches tall. Palmer amaranth and common ragweed plants that exceed this height are challenging to control. This report summarizes research and discusses the challenges of managing large Palmer amaranth and common ragweed plants. Authors: Kurt Vollmer, Michael Flessner, Dwight Ligenfelter, Vijay Singh, Mark Vangessell, and John Wallace. Title: Control of Large Palmer Amaranth and Common Ragweed in Soybean or Corn (FS-1192)