Bacteria

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Updated: September 15, 2021

Sanitation Important in Transplant Production Houses

By now almost all growers have started transplant production or have hired someone else to grow their transplants. With all of the important things that go into transplant production one of the sanitation factors that is somewhat neglected is weed control. Figure 1 shows the outside edge of a high tunnel production house in February. The grower was getting ready to drop seed in just a few days after they cleaned up the house from the fall growing season. This particular grower had been having intermittent problems with thrips (and consequently tomato spotted wilt virus) and two spotted spider mites in their production house.
Chickweed present inside and outside a high tunnel being prepared for transplant production
Updated: September 15, 2021

Southern Bacterial Wilt of Tomato Found

Southern bacterial wilt of tomato, which is caused by the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum Race 1, has been found in a couple of tomato fields in the past week. This pathogen affects many solanaceous crops and is found throughout the southern United States.
Updated: September 14, 2021

Striped Cucumber Beetles and Bacterial Wilt

Striped cucumber beetles (Acalymma vittatum) (SCB) are the most important insect pests of muskmelon and cucumbers in our area. They overwinter as adults and emerge when temperatures reach 54–62°F at which time they begin searching for cucurbit hosts. Volatiles produced by the plant attracts SCB to cucurbits initially, then male SCBs produce an aggregation pheromone attracting more beetles. The beetles tend to mass on small plants where they eat, mate and defecate (fig 1).
Early season feeding of SCB on cucumber
Updated: May 12, 2021

Southern Bacterial Wilt of Tomato Found

Southern bacterial wilt of tomato, which is caused by the soil-borne bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum Race 1, has been found in several tomato fields just recently. This pathogen affects many solanaceous crops and is found throughout the southern United States.
Tomato stem infected with R. solanacearum, split in half, showing discolored vascular tissue (yellow arrow) and pith (blue arrow).
Updated: April 22, 2021

Greenhouse Pesticides & Bactericides for Vegetables

Greenhouse Pesticides & Bactericides for Vegetables
Updated: March 12, 2021

Selected Fungicides and Bactericides Labeled for Greenhouse Use

Selected Fungicides and Bactericides Labeled for Greenhouse Use
Updated: January 27, 2021

Recognizing and Preventing Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) Infection in Poultry

Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a bacteria-like organism that causes respiratory disease primarily in chickens and turkeys but it can also infect gamebirds, pigeons, ducks, geese, peafowl and wild birds. MG infection in chickens is also known as Chronic Respiratory Disease (CRD).
Updated: January 22, 2021

Methods for the Detection of Vibrio Species

Vibrio bacteria naturally inhabit coastal waters and are frequently isolated from a variety of raw seafood, particularly oysters. Detection of Vibrio species in seafood and growing water has traditionally been problematic because of the limitations of conventional techniques based on plate culture methods. Moreover, no culture method is able to discriminate pathogenic populations. In order to provide education and training to individuals involved in seafood testing, a hands-on training course has been developed and offered through cooperative efforts of University of Maryland Extension (UME) and University of Maryland’s Joint Institute of Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (JIFSAN). The methods described in this manual are designed for detection and enumeration V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae in oysters. The analytical methods are combination of procedures from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) and other sources, and have been used as training protocols for the hands-on training course on Vibrio Detection.