University of Maryland Extension

What Weed Is This?

What Weed Is This?
4’ tall stand Anthriscus sylvestris or wild chervil

Robert Frost I am not, but this weed has become more and more prevalent throughout many of the counties in Central Maryland and is spreading vigorously through the Pacific Northwest, the great lakes area, New England, as well as parts of Canada.

Actually I only found a brief description of this particular weed in the New England Wild Flower Society’s Flora Novae Anglia.

We (Carroll Master Gardeners and self) have seen this weed becoming more and more abundant through much of Carroll and surrounding counties in the past 10 years. It is increasing prevalent along road sides, abandoned fields and forest edges.

Kathy O’Neill, a Carroll County Master Gardener, successfully identified this relatively new weed species several years ago after ---- much head scratching. The plant is Anthriscus sylvestris or Wild Chervil

Close up of foliage, notice compound foliage.

Detail of leaf attachment. Notice hair pattern.

Classic biennial/perennial root system

Umbel formation of seed.

This weed looks similar to many of the other plants in the Carrot Family and has been easily confused with wild carrot, cow parsnip, and poison hemlock. There have been reports of contact dermatitis (see - http://piercecountyweedboard.wsu.edu/noxious-weeds). Several states have placed this on “watch lists” or now consider it invasive.

For additional information please see the following:

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