University of Maryland Extension

Resources for Established Businesses

Food for Profit 2

Beyond the Start-up–Growing Your Specialty Foods Business

Launching a specialty food business can be exciting and rewarding. Seeing your product sales grow and nurturing your entrepreneurial dreams can be very fulfilling. But scaling a specialty food business into a sustainable, profitable business requires advanced training and technical mentoring in the areas of:

In an effort to supply resources and training materials, this section of the Maryland Rural Enterprise Development Center is compiling a resource list of both private and public videos, articles, industry support agencies and facilities, and published training materials that support scaling up entrepreneurial food businesses. No endorsement is implied or exclusion intended and no guarantee of reliability is implied. This is by no means a complete listing of all organizations and associations servicing the specialty foods industry in Maryland.

 

REGULATIONS


Unraveling the Impact of FSMA on Acidified Food Regulations
Omar Oyarzabel, EAS Consulting Group and University of Vermont; Priya Rathnam, Food and Drug Administration (published Dec 18, 2017)
Field to Fork-Spring 2018: Developing and Selling Food Products That are Safe and Tasty                 
Clifford Hall, Professor, Food Science, NDSU Plants Sciences Department (Video uploaded by NDSUExtension, published May 22, 2018)
Food Safety & Regulatory Training-Food Innovation Center at Rutgers
(published Dec 13, 2018)
         

Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food: Guidance for Industry
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Food and Drug Administration Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (published January 2018)


FDA Issues Revised Draft Guidance for Control of Listeria monoc  ytogenes in Ready-To-Eat Foods

 FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

 FOOD RULES AND REGULATIONS

 

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

FOOD VENTURE CENTERS

PACKAGING AND LABELING

FOOD LABELING

RECALL PLANS

The primary goal of a food recall is to protect public health by removing products from commerce that have been determined to be unsafe. A recall plan can aid in the execution of a recall by apportioning duties, centralizing current contact information, and providing prewritten templates for communications.

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