University of Maryland Extension

STEM Activities & Resources

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Related Webstes:

  • eGFI -- Engineering, Go For It! eGFI is sponsored by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). They are committed to promoting and enhancing efforts to improve K-12 STEM and engineering education.
  • Space Place from NASA Check out games, animations, projects, and fun facts about Earth, space and technology.
  • Night Sky Notes The Night Sky Notes is a place to keep skywatchers up to date on what's up in the sky. Check back often to find out what's new and visible in our ever changing sky
  • Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Careers Information about careers in Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Science Buddies Free Science Fair Project Ideas, Answers and Tools for Serious Students
  • The Science of Cooking Discover how a pinch of curiosity can improve cooking! Explore recipes, activities, and Webcasts that will enhance your understanding of the science behind food and cooking.
  • Kid Wind Promote wind power through education and activities that challenge, engage and inspire all ages
  • Mixing in Math This Web site is a free resource for those looking for easy ways to integrate math into out-of-school time. The activities are geared toward K-6 grade and are available in English and Spanish. Educators and parents can use these activities to put math into a variety of topics such as cooking, telling stories, gym exercises, and arts and crafts projects.
  • Natural History Museum in London Find on-line science activities for kids, families and teachers as well as highlights of current collections at the museum.
  • Galaxy Zoo Find out how you can help astronomers explore the universe. You will view images from the NASAQ's Hubble Space Telescope and classify them by shape.
  • Zero Robotics: Zero Robotics is the first robotics competition in space! A partnership between MIT, NASA, and the International Space Station (ISS), students on teams across the world learn coding principles, math, computer science, and physics to virtually program satellite robots on the ISS, with the Astronauts giving play-by-play. Middle school and high school competitions take place each year, including in Maryland!
  • PhET Interactive Simulations: The PhET website is the place to go to perform experiments and explore the world without ever leaving your chair! Run by the University of Colorado Boulder, PhET simulations are fun, engaging, and free interactive experiences that cover every branch of science and mathematics. You’d never be able to do some of these experiments at home or even at school, so don’t miss out, do them online at PhET!
  • Code.org: Computer science is an ever-growing and evolving field that also has one of the largest shortages of qualified candidates in the modern world. Code.org, who also leads the annual “Hour of Code,” offers fun projects and opportunities for youth to get engaged in computer science, while also working to increase its diversity and exposure to underserved populations. Creating new art projects, sprite designs, cell-phone apps, and games are just some of the fun projects kids can do in their virtual lab!
  • FIRST Robotics Competitions (Jr. FLL, FLL, FTC, FRC): FIRST is home to the largest and longest-running STEM competitions in the world, including FIRST Lego League, FIRST Tech Challenge, and FIRST Robotics Competition. Interested in robotics or trying to find a team? Take a look and get in on the fun!
  • VEX Competitions: VEX Robotics is a new approach to the competitive robotics world, with competitions for grade-school youth all the way through college. VEX IQ, VEX EDR, and VEX Pro await newcomers to get involved and become inspired, one robot at a time.
  • Meet The Greens: This site on PBS Kids is about “The Greens,” a family that lives green. Based off a former PBS television show called “Meet the Greens,” their goal was to encourage kids to explore sustainability and topics in the world of environmental science. Episodes of the show are available to view on the site. Many interesting activities and ideas are also located at the “Special Features” link. It also features an Activity Guide for adults who work with 9 to 12-year olds. Print copies of “The Greens” can be ordered by e-mailing wgbhmaterialsreq@wgbh.org.
  • NXTprograms.com: Love the Lego Mindstorms, but haven’t been able to find any new projects or ideas to use them for recently? This website has both building and programming ideas for the Lego Mindstorms line of robots, including both EV3 and NXT. Build instructions are included, in full color, and most are designed by kids!
  • KiwiCo: KiwiCo offers monthly projects to kids of all ages! Broken down into 7 lines with varying age ranges and topics of focus, KiwiCo kits are hands-on, fun, and educational kits for kids young and old to become problem solvers and expand their creativity. The best part? Kids can do them at their own pace!
  • Science Sparks: Science Sparks makes science fun for kids! With lots of great ideas for fun science experiments to do at home, ideas for science fair projects, free worksheets for teachers to use in the classroom, and a bevy of fun facts to peruse, Science Sparks is one of the few one-stop shops for both kids and educators alike.
  • NASA For Students: NASA’s youth website continues to grow, featuring resources and curriculum for educators as well as fun and engaging activities for youth, divided up by grade level. Fun videos, event information, the NASA Kids’ Club, and internship opportunities are just some of the cool things for kids and adults to explore!
  • Hyperphysics: Do you enjoy Physics and Astronomy?... like REALLY enjoy them? Any questions about these complex and at times intimidating topics can be answered here. Georgia State’s website on Physics is an incredibly thorough and in-depth look at the subject featuring easily clickable crosslinks, pictures, breakdowns of complex equations, and even some interactive activities. It’s time to demystify Physics!
  • Physics Classroom: Physics can be hard, and sometimes, having everything in one spot for kids and educators to look at when trying to “force” through the concepts can be really useful! With curriculum and worksheets available that align to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), plus interactive pages to help teach specific subjects across the entire physics “spectrum,” there’s a lot to look at. Plus, there are even specific resources for kids who will be taking the ACT test and for teachers who need help writing tests. The site is truly the “Big Bang” for getting through Physics in one piece!
  • Smithsonian Museum: The largest museum, education, and research complex in the world has a site for people to explore and interact with their science and nature exhibits. From tree frogs to fossils to computers to planetariums, the Smithsonian has it all!
  • Lawrence Hall of Science: The Lawrence Hall of Science, based at the University of California Berkeley, is a hub for lots of fun activities and resources for both in-person and online visitors. The museum has modern exhibits going all the way back over 65 million years, while the website has apps for kids that have been downloaded over 1 million times! They even have NGSS-aligned activities and curriculum for educators plus activities for kids to do online too. They have everything… but that’s Berkeley for you!
  • Cospaces.io: Interested in Virtual Reality or Augmented Reality? Ever wanted to create your own 3D VR/AR worlds? Cospaces.io is the website to do just that! Once you create a free account, you can then open the app on almost any cellphone, insert it into a compatible VR/AR headset, and take a tour of all your virtual worlds firsthand. Also, built-in Scratch programming can be used to make your world even more interactive!
  • TinkerCAD: Interested in 3D printing and 3D modeling? Never done 3D modeling before though? That’s okay! TinkerCAD is the most popular 3D modeling program for kids! Learn how to 3D model objects, import 3D objects and edit them, and export your creations to view or even 3D print. You can do it all!
  • USA Science & Engineering Festival: The USA Science & Engineering Festival is one of the largest STEM events in the nation, taking place bi-annually at the Washington DC Convention Center. Over 400,000 people attended the 2018 festival over the course of 3 days, which featured over 3000 interactive exhibits. The next festival will be in 2020, with the theme “Vision of STEM,” but other STEM events across the nation are also featured!
  • Instructables: Like to build things? You just hit paydirt! With Arduinos, leather, cosplay, jewelry, 3D printing, cooking, woodworking, gardening, and more, Instructables is where you can learn how to make just about anything!

The Educational Equity Center at the Academy for Educational Development (EEC/AED) through a grant from the National Science Foundation has developed Great Science for Girls: Extension Services for Gender Equity in Science through After School Programs (GSG), to provide inquiry-based, informal science learning programs that will stimulate girls’ curiosity, interest and persistence in STEM and break down the barriers of gender stereotyping.

Great resources are available for purchase to further the idea of Science and Math are FUN!

STEM Websites for Girls

  • Wonderwise-Women in Science Learning Series Introduces you to women who have made science their career.
  • Carnegie STEM girls This site is where girls can connect with the people and opportunities that can make their dreams happen.
  • Nerd Girls This website highlights a growing, global movement which celebrates smart-girl individuality that’s revolutionizing our future. They want to encourage other girls to change their world through Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, while embracing their feminine power.
  • Engineer Girl Read about the EngineerGirl! Essay Contest. Find out more about engineering careers.See profiles of women engineers.Find out what classes to take in high school to pursue an engineering career.
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