University of Maryland Extension

Small Fruit Articles

Disease Management - Botrytis Botrytis is the major disease on a grower's radar screen Infections can occur early in the season during bloom and later in the season from bunch closing on to harvest.
Early Season Insect Management: Flea Beetles Identification and Biology Grape Flea beetles, Altica spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), are small (4-5 mm), oval shaped, metallic blue-purple beetles that jump when disturbed. Grape flea beetles overwinter as adults and become active on warm April days when grape buds begin to swell. Adult beetles are most numerous following mild winters.
Early Season Insect Management: Climbing Cutworms This general term applies to the larvae (caterpillars) of a large number of butterfly/moth species (Lepidoptera) in the noctuid family that feed on buds, young shoots and leaves. Cutworm damage most commonly occurs in vineyards with weeds under the trellis or mulch, and in sandy or light colored soils.
Early-Season Disease Management Growers should apply a series of protectant fungicide sprays to new shoots to protect them from several diseases, beginning shortly after bud break.
The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) - Part 2: Management The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a small vinegar fly with the potential to damage many fruit crops, particularly thin-skinned fruit. SWD was first detected in the western United States in 2008 and has already become a major pest of many fruit and berry crops in Maryland, with potential to cause significant damage to grapes.
Grape Berry Moth Although the Japanese beetle is rapidly moving to the top of the list in many areas of Maryland the grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana; GBM) has typically been the most significant insect pest in the vineyard due to its direct and indirect damage to the berries and clusters.
Japanese Beetles Japanese beetles can periodically be a significant pest in Maryland vineyards. They create large holes in the younger leaves of vines and cause severe lacing and even fruit damage in heavy infestations. The population build up is typically periodic and cyclic and may require control tactics in years of large infestations.

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