University of Maryland Extension

Aronia

Base Name: 
aronia

Cultivation Range

Since aronia has a chill requirement for break winter dormancy, not all locations in the U.S. are suitable for fruit production. Breaking winter dormancy requires that dormant buds receive a minimum of chill time before they can open in the spring. Since all the varieties are of similar genetic...

Cultivation Range

Since Aronia has a chill requirement for break winter dormancy, not all location in the U.S. are suitable for fruit production. Breaking winter dormancy requires that dormant buds receive a minimum of chill time before they can open in the spring. Since all the varieties are of similar genetic...

Research

At Wye Research and Education Center an active orchard has been maintained and studied for over 9 years. During that time, several interesting conclusions have been drawn. Aronia can be grown organically because of few pest species Relatively low fertilizer rates can be use to maintain yield and...

Production Timeline

October or early March – Fertilize 0.25 oz N per plant – Prune; remove dead/diseased tissue Mid to Late April – Plant will begin bloom – Watch for Blister beetles May – Evaluate Yield – Look for Lace Bug and Aphids – Look for Cherry Fruit Worm Adult – Watch for Rust symptoms June – Spray for Cherry...

Pest Monitoring

While Aronia is a hardy plant, it does have a number of potential pest species that can have a large affect on plant health and fruit yield. Throughout the year, growers are encouraged to monitor their Aronia orchard to stay on top of possible insect, disease and other pest problems. For now, there...

Phenology

Phenology Depending on your location, Aronia will flower between late April and mid-May. Flowers will persist for about 3 to 7 days. Many species of bees pollinate the flowers but Aronia is apomictic and does not require fertilization for fruit production. Fruit begins setting and developing...

Establishment and Management

Aronia tolerates a variety of soils and pH’s, however to optimize growth a soil test should be performed before plants and soil should be amended following the recommendations for fruit trees. The plants should be placed in full sun. When planting, consider how the fruit will be harvested and what...

An Old Fruit Crop, New to Maryland Farms

A new alternative crop is being studied by University of Maryland Extension for organic fruit production. The Black Chokeberry or Aronia, to which it is commonly referred, is an eastern U.S native with a long history of fruit production in Eastern Europe. The Aronia fruit is about the size of a...

Contacts

Dr. Andrew Ristvey Dr. Andrew Ristvey is a University of Maryland extension specialist for commercial horticulture. He received his Master of Science degree from University of Maryland, Eastern Shore in 1993. He earned his Doctorate in Horticulture in 2004 from University of Maryland, College Park...

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