University of Maryland Extension

New Farmer Articles

Using a Business Organization Structure to Limit Your Farm’s Liability In Maryland, 82.7 percent of agricultural operations conduct business as sole proprietorships (Census of Agriculture, 2012). As agriculture continues to evolve, however, producers should consider investigating all types of business organization structure for their operations to limit liability and provide additional forms of capital.
Developing Your Agricultural Land Lease: Updating the Rental Rate Photo by Edwin Remsberg This post is not intended to provide legal advice
Equine Disposal Guide for Maryland Horse Owners (EB-421) Have you ever lost a horse or made the difficult decision to euthanize a horse? Then what do you do?  Properly handling a large animal after it has passed away can be difficult. Publication EB-421 from the University of MD Extension helps guide horse owners in each MD county in the disposal options available.
Review of Lender Requirements for Beginning Farmer Loan Programs (FS-975) The Center for Agricultural and Natural Resource Policy and UME's Beginning Farmer Success program have developed a fact sheet to help beginning farmers understand the various credit sources available in the state of Maryland and the requirements associated with each credit source, such as USDA's Farm Service Agency, a Farm Credit lender, or MARBIDCO.
Frequently Asked Questions: How Do I Set a Good Rental Rate?             Back in September, I posted cash rents at the county level for Maryland and Delaware.  The count
Managing the Weed Seedbank with Cover Crops and Tillage University of Maryland Department of Entomology*Post-DoctoralResearch Associate, **Associate Professor and Extension Specialist  
Offing Cover Crops for Weed Suppression: Featuring the Roller Crimper and Other Mechanical Contraptions !Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, $Graduate Student and *Faculty Research AssociateUniversity of Maryland, Department of Entomology  
The Plight of Clint and His Monoculture Practices $SESYNC intern, # Graduate student and !Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, University of MD Dept. of Entomology  
Using Flowering Plants to Help Parasitic Wasps Attack Stink Bug Eggs $Graduate Student, *Associate Professor and Extension Specialist
Fungal Entomopathogens: An Enigmatic Pest Student Research Assistant(1), Associate Professor and Extension Specialist(2)University of Maryland Department of Entomology
A Look at Business Organization Structures: Sole Proprietorship This post should not be relied upon as legal advice
Let’s Partner Up: General Partnership Overview This post should not be relied upon as legal advice
A Closer Look At The Corporation Business Structure This post should not be relied upon as legal advice
Virus Infections Common in Some Pumpkin Fields This Year Figure 1. Pumpkin plant infected with watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) August 12, 2014
Ignite Your Sales with Sensory Branding Ag Marketing - News Update   Product Positioning and Branding
Grape Berry Moth Although the Japanese beetle is rapidly moving to the top of the list in many areas of Maryland the grape berry moth (Paralobesia viteana; GBM) has typically been the most significant insect pest in the vineyard due to its direct and indirect damage to the berries and clusters.
Japanese Beetles Japanese beetles can periodically be a significant pest in Maryland vineyards. They create large holes in the younger leaves of vines and cause severe lacing and even fruit damage in heavy infestations. The population build up is typically periodic and cyclic and may require control tactics in years of large infestations.
High Beef Prices Ag Marketing - News Update Retail beef prices are at a 20 year high.  I have been asked why?  Why is beef so high? The reasons:
The Customer is Still King Ag Marketing News Update
Organic Weed Control in No-Till Vegetable Systems Organic vegetable growers have a hard time managing weeds, as there are no reliable Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) chemicals for controlling grass or broad leaf weeds. Most of the time growers depend on tillage for weed control, but excess tillage can lead to destruction of soil structure and the loss of carbon from the soil.

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