University of Maryland Extension

ANMP Articles

Soil pH Affects Nutrient Availability Soils are composed of mineral and organic matter.  Weathered rocks provide soil minerals, while organic matter forms from decayed animal and plant residues.  An important component of healthy soil, organic matter helps maintain and improve soil’s physical condition.
Fall Soil Nitrate Test (FSNT) (EBR-15) Recent research has demonstrated that winter wheat and barley grain yields and economic return to fertilizer applications are not reliably improved by a fall nitrogen application when an adequate amount of nitrate already exists in the soil.
EBR-15 Fall Soil Nitrate Test (FSNT) Recent research has demonstrated that winter wheat and barley grain yields and economic return to fertilizer applications are not reliably improved by a fall nitrogen application when an adequate amount of nitrate already exists in the soil.
11. Following Up Step 11. Following UpAfter delivery of the nutrient management plan, there are many things a nutrient management advisor can do to follow up with the producer including calibrating manure spreaders, conducting a Pre-Sidedress Soil Nitrate Test (PSNT) and/or a Corn Stalk Nitrate Test (CSNT), and estimating corn silage and corn grain yield.
10. Record Keeping Step 10. Record Keeping Record keeping is good practice for agricultural operations. For nutrient management, crop yield records, by field, support yield goals used to develop nutrient recommendations. In addition, records of equipment calibration and organic applications confirm proper application rates and that nitrogen credits are assigned to the appropriate fields.
9. Relevant MDA Documents for Complete Plans Step 9. Submitting Plan ComponentsParts of a completed nutrient management plan must be submitted to the Maryland Department of Agriculture (MDA). In addition, operators must follow their nutrient management plan (or document reasons for not following it) and file an annual report on their implementation of the plan.
8. Compiling and Reviewing Your Nutrient Management Plan Step 8. Compiling and Reviewing Your Nutrient Management Plan It is important that a nutrient management plan be well-organized and contain all the necessary components as required by Maryland Nutrient Management Regulations. Using a checklist can help ensure that all necessary components are included in the plan.
7. Generating Recommendations Step 7. Generating Recommendations Nutrient recommendations based upon representative soil samples, yield goal information, and research are the core of a nutrient management plan.
6. Calculating the Phosphorus Site Index (PSI) and the University of Maryland Phosphorus Management Tool (UM-PMT) Step 6. Calculating the Phosphorus Site Index (if fields have an FIV-P greater than or equal to 150)The Phosphorus Site Index (PSI) is a field-by-field tool designed to identify critical areas where there is a high phosphorus loss potential and a large source of phosphorus present in the soil. The UM-PMT is replacing the PSI in the near future.
5. Tissue Sampling and Testing Step 5. Tissue Sampling and Testing (if applicable) Tissue analyses are the bases for nutrient recommendations for fruit nutrient management plans. The following worksheets and information sheets will assist you with the tissue sampling and testing step of nutrient management plan development.
4. Compost Testing Step 4. Compost Testing (if applicable) Obtaining a representative organic sample is the basis for developing recommendations for organic sources such as compost. When sending to a lab for analysis, make sure you request the following tests:
3. Manure (and Other Organic Source) Sampling and Testing Step 3. Manure (and Other Organic Source) Sampling and Testing (if applicable)Obtaining a representative organic sample is the basis for developing reliable recommendations for manures and other organic sources.
2. Soil Sampling and Testing Step 2. Soil Sampling and TestingRepresentative soil samples, which have been properly collected and analyzed, become the basis for nutrient recommendations.
1. Data Collection Step 1. Data CollectionCollecting and carefully organizing information (data collection) from the field site along with the producer interview is the first step in developing a nutrient management plan.
Nutrient Management Planning Tools Handbook What is a Nutrient Management Plan?A nutrient management plan is a formal document that balances crop nutrient needs with nutrients that are applied in the form of commercial fertilizer, animal manure, or biosolids.A plan contains:
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